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21+ SHOW | MOVED FROM THE FINE LINE

Cults

with Cullen Omori and Hideout

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

7:00 pm

$18.00 ADVANCE | $20.00 DOOR

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Note: This show has been moved from the Fine Line, and all tickets purchased for the Fine Line show will be honored. If you purchased a reserved table for the Fine Line show, this will be honored and you will receive a table at the Turf Club.

If you purchased a ticket for the Fine Line show and would like a refund, please contact etix at 1-800-514-3849 or support.etix.com. If you purchased tickets at an outlet or box office, you can request a refund at The Depot Tavern. All refund requests must be submitted by Monday, October 23.



CULTS

Cults made their name in black and white. A pair of film school dropouts who burst onto the New York scene with a perfect single and a darkly retro sound, the band’s first two albums play like noirish documentaries on a lost girl group. Four years after Static, Cults returns with Offering, an exciting collection of songs bursting with heart, confidence, shimmering melody and buzzing life. The time off has given the band new energy and new ideas–Cults are working in Technicolor now.

The core duo remains the same. Madeline Follin and Brian Oblivion, both 28, still live in New York. They still finish each other’s thoughts and still share a love of catchy music and black humor (this is a band that sampled cult leader Jim Jones on their first hit). But the pair have put some blood on the tracks since their breakout debut: they’ve toured the world, built a devoted audience, survived a breakup, grown up in green rooms, parted ways with their old label and made a home of their new one. After the whirlwind of Static died down, Follin and Oblivion made a conscious decision to shift gears:

“I feel like we stepped into a tour van when we were 21, and basically didn’t get out of it for the next few years,” Oblivion says. “We wanted to give ourselves some space to have normal lives, and wait until there was something new to say.”

“It was exciting, because writing stopped feeling like a homework assignment. I was able to sit down and do it only when I wanted to,” says Follin. “These songs are less art projects, less thinking ‘this is a heartbreak song, what would Lesley Gore do?’ and more reflective of things that have happened in our own lives.”

Cults took their time, going through a few dozen discarded demos before arriving on a pair of songs that felt special– the rollicking, sweet-but-dark “Right Words” and the buzzy earworm “Recovery.” Once they had a direction, Follin and Oblivion enlisted longtime engineer Shane Stoneback to help guide the sessions, working bit by bit, never rushing, letting the material develop naturally.

Offering will thrill ride-or-die Cults fans. Songs like “Natural State” and “Good Religion” balance on the same after-hours wall of sound that brought the band its early audience. The title track, a rolling goth-ed out anthem for the kids in the back of class is surely, somewhere in an alternate universe, soundtracking an 80s prom movie directed by Jim Jarmusch.

But Offering goes places Cults haven’t gone before. Pink Floyd was a big inspiration, freeing up the band to try new song structures and play with vintage synths, notably on the gorgeous, aching “With My Eyes Closed.”  “I had the classic high school discovery of Pink Floyd, only I was 24,” laughs Oblivion. “I was in the back of the tour van, listening to Dark Side of The Moon on headphones for the first time, and I turned to the band and said ‘guys. GUYS.”


CULLEN OMORI

Cullen Omori knows it’s a false cliche to say there are no second acts in American lives, but after the 2014 breakup of his acclaimed band the Smith Westerns, living that cliche was his greatest fear. His solo debut New Misery, out March 18 on Sub Pop Records, is a direct challenge to that anxiety: an album that goes beyond the glam punch of the Smith Westerns to new sounds, new sources of inspiration, and greater self-awareness. “I had this overwhelming feeling that perhaps the apex of my life both as a musician and as an individual would be relegated to five years in my late teens/early 20s,” says Omori, who was launched into the music industry when the Smith Westerns, who started in high school in Chicago, became fast-rising indie stars. “This fear really forced me to work hard as to not see the Smith Westerns as an end but as a point along a bigger trajectory.”


HIDEOUT

HIDEOUT… is the moniker of Manhattan-based songwriter and longtime live member of indie-pop band Cults, Gabriel Rodriguez. His sophomore album So Many Hoops/So Little Time is out now via Small Plates. It’s been two years since the release of Hideout’s debut album Rookie, and in that time many things have changed for Rodriguez. Most tragically, the passing of his brother. So Many Hoops/So Little Time deals with grief in different spectrums –– the album ranges both sonically & lyrically from whimsical space-pop to crushing acoustic vulnerability. There isn’t a singular concept or message, but the deeper you delve into Hideout’s world the more you feel nostalgia and a sense of loss.