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Rescheduled from 4/1/20

ALGIERS (CANCELED)

GANSER

Wednesday, December 02
Show | 8:30pm // Doors | 7:30pm
$16
21+ SHOW

THIS SHOW HAS BEEN CANCELED

There is no rescheduled date, but we are now offering credit for canceled shows. Please carefully fill out the form at the link below to receive a credit equaling your ticket purchase for this event. You can then apply that credit to a future ticket purchase for most events at the same venue as your original ticket purchase. You can also call etix to request a credit at 1-800-514-3849.

REQUEST A CREDIT

Once you’ve found a new event you’d like to apply your credit to, please contact etix at support@etix.com, or 1-800-514-3849.

After a two week period, all tickets purchased online (that have not opted for a credit) will be automatically refunded.

If you are interested and able to donate, consider putting the cost of your ticket toward the TC Music Community Trust’s Entertainment Industry Relief Fund in support of individuals in need. All funds donated will directly impact someone who has lost a gig due to COVID-19 and its effect on the industry. The outpouring of words of encouragement and monetary donations thus far has been incredible, and we thank you for your continued support of the Twin Cities music scene. Donation link and more information can be found here.

For any ticketing questions, please contact etix at support.etix.com or 1-800-514-3849.


Previously: The Algiers show originally scheduled for April 1 has been rescheduled and will take place on December 2, 2020. All tickets purchased for the April 1 performance will remain valid for the new date, so please hang on to your original ticket for entrance.

Note: $1.00 per ticket charitable donation to benefit TC Music Community Trust


ALGIERS

In the FBI file on the American rock ‘n’ roll band Algiers—which given their prior penchant for repping the Black Panthers, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and Afeni Shakur, among others, surely exists—under the subheading for their third album, There is No Year, the intelligence should soon read: all prior analytics appear outdated… this undoes everything we thought we knew about their intentions…what hides inside them… as if they are mutating live on camera, between frames…

Indeed, even those aware of the ideals of this outspoken four-piece will find their latest direction traversing unprecedented ground. Coming off two years of nonstop world-touring for their critically acclaimed second album, The Underside of Power—including Central and Eastern Europe, the Baltic States and the Balkans, where they have established a rabid following; an extended stint opening for Depeche Mode in huge stadiums such as the 75,000-capacity Olympiastadion in Berlin; as well as Glastonbury 2019—There is No Year solidifies and expands upon the doom-laden soul of their foundation, toward an even more epic, genre-reformatting sound, one somehow suspended in the amber of “a different era,” as described by guitarist Lee Tesche.

From the instant synth-pulse of the opening seconds of There is No Year, it’s clear that Algiers have set out to stake new ground, internally as much as sonically. At the forefront of this evolution is the centrality of power housed in Algiers’ multi-instrumentalist lead vocalist, Franklin James Fisher, whose voice and words provide the backbone of the album, his lyrics sourced entirely from an epic poem, “Misophonia,” composed during his search for meaning amidst a protracted personal period of anxiety and lack.

“What I wanted to do is create a negative space wherein I can exist and engage but at the same time not be so exposed,” Fisher explains. He speaks of the record’s perspective as not only a political apparatus, but an intimate, responsive evocation of his understanding that “nothing is ever what you expect”, that what might seem for now to be well known or assured is not always so, that there is no safety net. The effect, as felt on the record, is undeniable: Fisher sounds like he is singing for his life—for all our lives, really—baring his soul while the walls disintegrate around us.

The pool that he draws on is at once penetrating and exhilarating, wielding its anguish like a mirror at Medusa, full of hell. Whether he is lilting over post-Lynchian synth-whorl like a spot-lit bandleader, as on “Unoccupied,” or reincarnating the spirit of thrumming ’80s R&B into a proto-no wave dancefloor classic straight from 2046, as on “Chaka,” there is a tangible emotional electricity to Fisher’s delivery, a personal valence that makes you want, more than anything, to believe, even while not quite knowing where we’re headed.

No less next-level in Algiers’ conception is the ambition of the aural architecture they manage to summon. Under the direction of producers Randall Dunn [Sunn O))), Earth] and Ben Greenberg [Zs, Uniform (as featured on Twin Peaks season 3)], the same exciting duo who first teamed up on Jóhann Jóhannsson’s Mandy soundtrack in 2018, the clearly studied composition of this new horizon finds an outlet for turmoil via a fascinating synthesis of styles—from future doo-wop from the trapped heart of ATL, where they began; to industrial soundscapes a la Scott Walker or Iggy Pop; to something like the synthetic son of Marvin Gaye and Blonde Redhead.

The whip-tight rhythm section of Ryan Mahan and Matt Tong (ex-Bloc Party) moves back and forth from infectious menace to sci-fi soundtrack to big band fever dream, seamlessly syncing fresh continuity. Mahan’s beat programming and synth constructions fill out the fibrous threshold, while Tesche’s sound-sleeves and aural-layering shapeshift into a richly polished means of exploration, revealing more and more the deeper you delve.

“This is the sowing / Of the whirlwind,” Fisher sings on “Repeating Night.” “Don’t forget it’s us against them.” There’s something more behind the curtain of our daily-headlined pain, the album’s title seems to suggest—something even larger at stake than rage, or even revolution; which is exactly what Algiers’ music appears to have resolved itself to channel, and to wield. Their essence on There is No Year is a statement of their defiance, their desire to feel and be human even beyond the necessary fight back, sprawling head-on into the burning wind of doubt and fear and all it’s claimed, arriving on the far side of calamity more alive than ever.

Ganser combines post-punk workmanship with aesthetic noise rock tendencies, inspired by cinematic visuals and imagist language. Composed of keyboardist / vocalist Nadia Garofalo, bassist / vocalist Alicia Gaines, drummer Brian Cundiff, and guitarist Charlie Landsman, equal parts Space Odyssey and Ghost World, this Chicago-based band channels anxiety’s heightened state to absurd ends. Their debut, Odd Talk, was released in 2018 on No Trend Records to favorable coverage from The New York Times, Billboard, Stereogum, and other publications. Building on their dissociative disorder namesake, their music is sometimes frenzied ("PSY OPS"), but sometimes contemplative ("Revel"), probing on questions of anxiety, intimacy, and avoidance.